Leica M6

My first Leica was an M6 TTL. I sold it in the mid-2000s and have since gone through a number of Leica bodies, from an M3 to an M8. For the past several years I’ve used an M3 and M4. I love them, but I sometimes missed having a meter in the camera rather than on the camera.

So I bought an M6

It’s the perfect M6 for me. It is one of the last 10 “Classic” M6 bodies ever produced (1998). It has had the finder optics upgraded to the flare-free “MP” version. The only framelines displayed are 28, 35, and 50mm. This makes for a bright, beautiful, clutter-free viewfinder.

I chose the M6 “Classic” version because they are generally less expensive than the newer TTL models, with no real disadvantage. I prefer the direction of the shutter dial to be the same as my older bodies.

I’ve put one roll through it, and it’s just as smooth and solid as the M3 and M4. Don’t let the forum trolls convince you otherwise.

As handy as having a built-in meter is, I found that I spent more time obsessing over the meter’s lights than I did looking at the subject. I didn’t expect that. I also ended up with a few badly-exposed shots due to a backlit subject. I would normally have just guessed the exposure. Instead I listened to the meter. I’ll have to re-learn when to stop trusting it!

Here are a few shots from the first roll. It’s Tri-X, shot at 1250 ISO and developed in Diafine, then scanned on the Pakon.

Steve
Ed
My favorite shoes
Leica M6

Social is no fun

I recently re-activated my Facebook account after a few months away. I missed seeing updates from family members and a few close friends. I also missed some of the topic-based “groups” I was part of.

I took a month or so off Twitter also, but now am back.

I’m finding that being on social media isn’t much fun anymore. I’ll stay for now, but the thrill is long gone.

Social is no fun

More shooting with the Hasselblad and a Flash

While many move toward carrying only an iPhone or small, mirrorless system, I’ve been thinking bigger.

Hasselblad 503CXi, 150mm Sonnar, Prism finder, D-Flash 40 on a bracket

A Hasselblad is big enough on its own, but add a prism finder, longer lens, and that big awkward flash unit and it becomes downright unwieldy. It’s also awesome. Most of my favorite images from recent years are from the Hasselblads. I blame the Zeiss lenses. I love the look they produce and have yet to find anything matching it.

The flash, a Hasselblad D-Flash 40, is a recent addition. With the 503CXi body, it’s fully TTL and meters directly off the film. This means getting a decent exposure every time without doing much of anything. I just set the camera to f8 and 125th second and shoot.

This is terrific for shooting indoors. I just don’t have the eye or the hands for handheld natural-light shooting indoors. I’ve always preferred natural-light photography, but using the Hasselblad handheld with an on-camera flash creates a different look, and I’m learning to enjoy it.

Andrew (2017). Hasselblad 503CXi. Zeiss Sonnar 150mm. HP5+
Steve (2017). Hasselblad 503CXi. Zeiss Sonnar 150mm. HP5+
Josh (2017). Hasselblad 503CXi. Zeiss Sonnar 150mm. HP5+
More shooting with the Hasselblad and a Flash